Drawer 29: Amethyst

“Intellectual Passion”

My Chinese Apothecary Chest:   in 1994, it arrived via container to California from Hong Kong, where I discovered beading during an ex-pat assignment.   Serves as the repository for my beads. Handcrafted. It has 52 Drawers, mostly sorted by color.

2017 Challenge: Create a Necklace a Week, using only the Beads from one Drawer at a time. Voila!  52 Necklaces!

Week 29/Drawer 29: July 19, 2017: “Intellectual Passion”

 I gently dumped out Drawers 29 and 30 since they have been sisters from the beginning—one was dedicated to lavender beads and the other to amethyst. Over the years, they became mixed into one big jumble; they needed sorting out.

I laughed out loud when I saw 76 tubes of seed beads had taken over half of drawer 29! I guess lavender/purple was my favorite color for a long time!  I reorganized them:  putting some in other drawers, some in my Girl Scout donation box (I plan to donate them in 2018 and teach local Girl Scouts how to bead), until I ended up with only 26 tubes of seed beads taking up one-third of Drawer 29.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As many seed beads as I had, I was dismayed at how little amethyst I had…until I remembered I had an overflow section in Drawer 47, so I reunited them. I found two strands of an amazing color of royal purple and set them aside for this week’s special necklace.

The strands were labeled “African Amethyst” and I thought it was some vendor’s idea of “marketing b— s—“ as my beloved Donnie liked to call it.

No. African Amethyst is a big deal!  Due to its brilliant royal purple color, it is setting the standard for the most desirable grade of amethyst.  It is completely in vogue and commands a 30% mark-up over regular light purple Brazilian stones or the deeper purple from elsewhere in the world.

Dilemma: how can I love my darker amethyst now that I’ve met African Amethyst?

Answer: I only own two strands of African Amethyst.  So, the deeper and lighter shades are what I will live with.

Based on what I paid for it, I purchased it before the rest of the world put African Amethyst in vogue. That is basically how I manage to keep my prices low—I base my retail price on what I paid for the beads, not what today’s value might be.

I strung these beads into a simple but elegant necklace with tiny faceted amethyst as spacers which allow the African gems to show off their sparkly facets. The center dangle is amethyst bezeled in gold-plate.  The clasp is brass.

Amethyst is the February birthstone. This necklace is 19” long and comes with matching earrings.  $109.

Allow me to postscript an amusing trivia I found: “Amethystos” is Greek for ‘not intoxicated’ due to their belief that drinking wine from an amethyst cup prevented drunkedness.

BROOCH FANTASIA

I will accept commissions combining your favorite brooch, contemporary or family antique, with my orphan pearls and appropriate other beads, probably seed beads and crystals.  The cost would be approximately $139.  We can exchange photos of your brooch and I’ll give you a firm quote.

I will accept commissions combining your favorite brooch, contemporary or family antique, with my orphan pearls and appropriate other beads, probably seed beads and crystals. The cost would be approximately $139. We can exchange photos of your brooch and I’ll give you a firm quote.

 

 

Time for something different! This is a beautiful Beadleful necklace and I am not ashamed of my pride because every time I wear it, I get many compliments. I shall tell you its story because I would like you to have the opportunity to have one of your own.

Over the years, when pearls, the freshwater variety I love to use, wouldn’t fit through my regular beading wire, I put them in a jar. Around the same time, I acquired this colorful brooch that my friend, Kyung and I bought in Christian Lacroix’ shop in the exclusive Carleton Hotel on La Croisette in Cannes. While we browsed, our husbands waited outside by the sea, watching the bathers. Needless to say, they weren’t bored.

We each found an irresistible brooch featured in Lacroix’ end-of-season sale. I used to wear mine to work on my suit lapel–so 1990’s. Fashion changed; I retired; the brooch went into my drawer.

Around 2010, my last year in California, I put the orphan pearls and the neglected brooch together. The pearls are of all sizes and shapes, drawn randomly from my stash, but strung on finer than normal bead wire. I used Japanese glass seed beads, fine and shiny, as well as crystals to add interest to the pearls. It takes five strands at a minimum to look good! I made an investment in a real gold or sterling silver clasp because this is a personal heirloom.

And I can do the same for you.

I will accept commissions combining your favorite brooch, contemporary or family antique, with my orphan pearls and appropriate other beads, probably seed beads and crystals. The cost would be approximately $139. We can exchange photos of your brooch and I’ll give you a firm quote. There’s only one disclosure; you must be aware that the fine bead wire I use means it’s fairly fragile, so handle with care.

 

Caption: This 18” long necklace of pearls and a favorite brooch is a show-stopper.

Trunk Show

Trunk Show December 6 & 7 2013

Hail West Coasters!

Hope to see you for my THIRD ANNUAL TRUNK SHOW…

 

Three Necklaces

“Chic Thrills” features a charming koi fish centerpiece I have had for a long time, waiting for the right mix of beads to show it off. Well, when nearly matching vintage orange Lucite (what plastic was called in the 1960’s) beads came into my possession, I had the answer. But what contrasting color to use? An odd green, don’t ask me why. I was so excited by the time I assembled the large faux pearl, the beetle wings and the small faux pearls, that I can’t remember how the colors all came together!
The fish is Asian in its origin as indicated by its large popping eyes and its elaborate tail display. It is a vintage piece perhaps made of resin with lots of nice carving marks on it.
The five beetle wings are iridescent and pointy and most unusual. A great conversation piece.
The necklace is almost 19″ long and the centerpiece dangle is 4″long.
Hammered gold-colored metal clasp, gold-filled wire connections in the dangle.
The price is $159 which includes earrings featuring green and orange beads with a beetle wing.

“A Smashing Good Time” is a classic sterling silver and turquoise necklace with a contemporary spin that the silver used here is a special basket weave pattern mastered by the Hill Tribes of northern Thailand. The clasp is also sterling silver by the Hill Tribes.
The turquoise chunky beads mix smooth and veined specimens of Chinese-mined turquoise stones.
The necklace is 23″ and the basket weave medallion is 2″ in diameter.
It is priced at $135.

“Flash Forward” is also color-forward: semi-precious amethyst beads matched with lime-dyed branch coral. The branch coral is bezeled with an electroplated gold bail for a shiny, blingy look. It is attached to the amethyst necklace and secured by two vermeil (gold plate over metal) beads. The necklace ends with more electroplated gold beads and a gold metal clasp.
Think of this piece as a fabulous good luck charm and wear it well!
The necklace measures 18″ and the centerpiece is 3″.
The price is $129.