Drawer 24: Black (with other colors). Revised to show color😘

“Grand Illusion”

My Apothecary Chest: in 1994, it arrived via container to California from Hong Kong, where I discovered beading during an ex-pat assignment. Serves as the repository for my beads.  Handcrafted.  It has 52 Drawers, sorted by color.

2017 Challenge: Create a Necklace a Week, using only the Beads from one Drawer at a time. Voila!  52 Necklaces!

Week 24/Drawer 24: June 14, 2017: “Grand Illusion”

Two weeks ago, I stated there were four black drawers. Now there are three!

I re-organized the contents into three drawers after tossing the ugly, donating the unwanted, and re-assigning others. I put iridescent beads, mostly shells, into Drawer 25 which you will see next week in a necklace of a very different style!

Let’s focus on this week’s design: Venetian glass.  It’s been a staple of mine for many years and I am down to a small supply left in Drawers 1 and 2.  I paired the Venetian with another love:  American Art glass by David Christensen.  See Week 17 for details on American Art Glass.

It is a mildly asymmetrical necklace but balanced so it will sit prettily on the neck. I needed some very shiny and medium sized beads for the top half and found those qualities in some plastic beads I bought at a yard sale back in the day when you could find real treasures in yard sales.

The clasp has a starring role with a fabulous oval piece of art glass and a sterling silver toggle I fashioned. Two perfect pieces of art glass found their way to the earrings.  All in all, a very satisfying creation.  20” long.  $99 for the set.

 

Drawer 19: Orange

 

Left to right: ‘S Wonderful and Lady Be Good

My Apothecary Chest: in 1994, it arrived via container to California from Hong Kong, where I discovered beading during an ex-pat assignment there. Serves as the repository for my beads.  Handcrafted.  It has 52 Drawers.

2017 Challenge: Create a Necklace a Week, using only the Beads from one Drawer at a time. Voila!  52 Necklaces!

Week 19/Drawer 19: May 3, 2017: “’S Wonderful” and “Lady Be Good” (Thanks, Gershwin!) 

An Ode to Orange:  It was accidental that I fell in love with orange and it was simultaneous with becoming a red-head.  It was primarily a wardrobe choice; then a home accessory; then beads.  A few years later I noticed I was presenting too many orange/coral/peach/rust necklaces, so I pulled back.  Now I settle for one at a time.  Never bore your collectors!

I found two interesting choices in Drawer 19, so I indulged my orange love and made two…against the better advice of mentors!

‘ S Wonderful is orange carnelian (read about carnelian in 3-22-17 blog) faceted beads, both small and medium in size, with a bold orange dichroic pendant with charming green squiggles and matching earrings. I found the dichroic at Glass Garden, made by a couple from Michigan,  in Bonita Springs, Florida, at their large 2016 Art Fair when all five Kelley Girls attended and enjoyed!  It is 19” + a 1.5” pendant.  Gold tone clasp. Priced at $89 for the set.

Lady Be Good started with the centerpiece, as most of my necklaces do. This creative take on a pod by Gail Crosman Moore (see blogs dated 4-12-17 and 5-11-16) is sculpted in oxidized brass in two pieces.  Inside is a lampwork glass thingie.  Feel free to name it!  I found a perfect match to the thingie in some orange vintage pressed glass melon-style beads.  I went longer for a 24” length + a 2” pod with a brass circle and toggle clasp and matching earrings.  $129 for the set.

This time I tried to be brief with words since I have three images, including one of me and my sisters looking like tourists under a banyan in Bonita Springs last year!

Left to right: Priscilla, Gail, Nancy, Maureen and Marilyn

 

 

 

 

 

 

Drawer 17: Dark Green

 

“Fascinating Rhythm”

I’m challenging myself in 2017 to create one necklace a week using only the beads from one drawer of my 52 drawer Apothecary Chest.

Week 17/Drawer 17: April 26, 2017: “Fascinating Rhythm”

In the glass bead world, a hierarchy of three levels exists: American Art Glass (officially called “furnace beads”); lampwork glass which I use a lot; and blown glass (see Drawer #1).

These American Art Glass beads were designed by David Christensen, Rhode Island, and I used to buy them from him by the hundreds when I lived in California. This dark green color was attractive to me because when you look closely, it sparkles due to the silver foil with which he embellished the green.

To get wonky for a moment, “furnace glass” is an American adaptation of an Italian method called “latticinio” which uses glass canes—like all three levels do—and encases them in clear glass, then manufactures them in large scale furnaces. They are not individually made, like lampwork and blown glass.

The most predominant stone in this necklace is green aventurine, which is from the ubiquitous quartz family. Sometimes I have to look twice to identify these beads since jade comes in a similar shade of green.

Also featured are some lovely pressed glass beads made in West Germany. They were hand made from 1948 to the 70’s, when they switched to machines.  I bought these vintage beads from a CA vender in 1995, so there is a chance they were hand-made.  They are the distinctive bullet-shaped beads and the leaves with white stripes.

Green Aventurine has some interesting properties: they are the heart chakra; they comfort; they settle nausea; and they give courage to the wearer in social situations.

In my quest for an unusual clasp, I found a green glass circle and paired it with an oversize pewter lobster clasp.

This two-strand necklace measures 21” and earrings are included. It is $99.

Part of the fun of each week’s necklace challenge is journaling in my “Maker’s Notebook”. It starts on the right where I leave four spaces for data which can only be entered after I finish the necklace. The body of my scribbles are thoughts that emerge as I am designing, then stringing, then closing off the necklace and earrings. On the left, I then do a drawing and color it in. I draw after completion; my design process lets the beads percolate as I gather piles of them–a process too intuitive to draw in advance.

Welcome to my Open Studio

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Teal windsocks on cross streets in Hull will mark the locations for fascinating studios where real artists work!

Please visit me in my studio in Hull Village on July 9 or 10, Saturday or Sunday from 10am to 5pm.

23 Andrew Ave (3rd Left after Library on Main St), Hull.

781-925-0484

Be prepared to find newly designed Beadleful necklaces, lots of my trademark chunky bead jewelry, some bracelets and earrings!

Also, Marilyn MacDonnell returns with fabulous totes, key chains, purses and a new line of beach towels!

OPEN STUDIOS has been proudly presented by www.hullartists.com for 21 years. Visit our website for a map and info about the 39 participating artists

 

Homage to Lampwork Glass Artist Beads

Local women's lampwork beads feature in this necklace with silver clasp. 20" long, $220

Local women artist’s lampwork beads feature in this necklace with silver clasp.
20″ long, $220

 

This wondrous necklace is sort of like a “One-of-a-Kind” (see blog dated Aug 7, 2013, “Oh, Oh, OK” for an explanation), but then again it’s not.  It is an OOK if I count only half of the beads as OOK.  It is not an OOK since most of the beads are artist made.

Enough of acronyms!  Let us explore this amazing necklace full of lampwork glass beads made by some awesome women!

Envision long sticks of colored glass, a source of fire coming from a mini blowtorch on a stand in front of the artist, and a metal mandrel.  Sit our artist down facing the fire, mandrel in the dominant hand to shape the glass into a bead, and, with her other hand, manipulating the glass rod as it heats up and goes molten.  This is Lampwork Glass.

I collect these beads as I go to bead shows.  Not for me, even though I am an incurable collector, but for you, wearers of my necklaces with these precious beads in them.

Identifying the artists whose beads make up this necklace is a special pleasure.  Sheila Checkoway’s beads and small fat discs feature first; starting from the silver clasp, after the sterling silver bar, are two of five of her beads followed by a small fat disc, one of six by this Massachusetts native.

Then we see one of two umbrella-shaped discs by Maureen Henriques of Pumpkin Hill Beads (MA) with a polka dot circle by Kennebunkport Bead Art.

Now find a Gail Crosman Moore (MA) bead, chubby and squat with bumps all around and more bumpy stuff happening on top.  Gorgeous in its excess!

Next is a modest disc (one of these gals has to do “modest” to ground all these blockbusters!) by “Two Sisters” whose shop in Carmel-by-the-Sea in CA is not to be missed!  Another Henriques umbrella shading a Two Sisters disc follow.

Then three Venetian glass beads which are blown (see blog dated Sept 20, 2013, “Murano Island Rising”) in a pale grey green.

The centerpiece lampwork is a fabulous design by Gail Crosman Moore whom I discovered in a show in Oakland, CA, over ten years ago.  I was impressed not only with her work but by the fact she lived in Western Massachusetts!  Now she has a shop in Cape Cod at 174 Commercial St, Provincetown.

Starting up the other side, notice a faux silver bead (cheap but high style) plus more Sheila and Venetian beads, back up to the silver bar.

The clasp is another piece of work, as they say colloquially.  An artful hook, although not artist-made, grasps a glass polka dot circle by Kennebunkport Bead Art.

This was a slowly percolating necklace that took years to come together.  The color is odd but soft and surprisingly neutral.  Perhaps it is best described as teal grey.  Gail’s beads add a teal blue.  My luck held out with the seed beads I found in my drawer—an interesting blueish green teal in matte Czech glass, not shiny.

The necklace is for sale.  No way could I hoard this!  It is for sale in my studio for $220.  Add $15 for mailing and insurance and it is yours.  It measures 20” long.

 

 

20 Years as a Bead Jewelry Artist

After 20 years, I am retiring my old logo of necklaces in the form of a “B”.  This is a good moment to thank Don Beadle for my fabulous last name!  Stay tuned for the new logo…hint…it’s orange.

After 20 years, I am retiring my old logo of necklaces in the form of a “B”. This is a good moment to thank Don Beadle for my fabulous last name! Stay tuned for the new logo…hint…it’s orange.

 

“Would you like to move to Hong Kong?”  Don’t the most fun things begin with a question?

 

My husband was offered a job assignment in Hong Kong in 1993, so I resigned from my Human Resources job and went along for the adventure.

Hong Kong is a shopper’s paradise, and I soon discovered I was attracted to beads.  When I filled up my drawers and started putting boxes of them under the bed, my husband asked me why I had so many beads.

My future became destined when I blurted out, “I’m going to make necklaces!”  So I set out to do so.  I thought my designs looked pretty fine, and, wisely, took a class to learn the fundamentals.

As a final judgment to my opinion on the attractiveness of my necklaces, I submitted them to the 1994 annual exhibit of the Royal Crafts Guild of Hong Kong, and was accepted.

 

In 1995, I decided I was retired from my corporate life. Bead jewelry became my business.  I wanted the risk of succeeding or failing.  It could never just be a hobby for me.  I took that brave step at the Silicon Valley Open Studios and loved every minute of it.

I still love the challenge of offering my work for sale:  it’s an instant thumbs up or down and it gives me feedback.  A thumbs down means that necklace gets taken apart at the end of the year and gets another chance at greatness.

Here we are in 2015.  I have made nearly 2700 necklaces; I never tire of the search for fabulous beads; and I still try to spend at least two hours several days a week in my studio.  I have changed marketplaces three times:  from Silicon Valley to San Luis Obispo to the South Shore of Boston.  I love change!

In 2015, I am working on being “Stupendous in my Seventies” and, when the time comes, “Energetic in my Eighties!”  All for the love of beads!

Picaresque

 

 

Necklace "Picaresque"

 

I intuitively named this necklace “Picaresque.” Upon thinking of the meaning as rogue or bohemian, it is really appropriate. This necklace is all about the centerpiece; I made it in a class in the 90’s, wore it in the bohemian era on a cord, and put it aside.

Recycled, reused and re-invented, it is happy now with yellow jade beads tying the centerpiece to the necklace. Only after living in Hong Kong and becoming a regular at the Jade Market did I realize how many colors of jade there are! This strand is a honey mustard shade, interspersed with the same ethnic beads as the centerpiece. It is finished with a gold metal clasp.

Let me describe the delicious beads featured in the centerpiece: The most roguish are the two irregular rounds of ram’s horn—the first and only time I had a chance to buy ram’s horn; from Morocco’s Atlas Mountains as I recall. My next favorite beads are the jasper and yellow striped beads. They are trade beads from Mozambique that I bought in a Lisbon, Portugal flea market in 1965…long before beading was a word that had even drifted through my mind!

You’ll also notice a conical wood bead in the same honey mustard shade, two ethnic jasper beads of unknown provenance, green sand-cast glass African beads, and glass jasper spacers. The framework for the centerpiece is brass wire.

The necklace measures 22” with the centerpiece 3” wide by 3 ½” long. The price is $215 including shipping.

Trunk Show

Trunk Show December 6 & 7 2013

Hail West Coasters!

Hope to see you for my THIRD ANNUAL TRUNK SHOW…

 

Oh, Oh, OK!

The necklace is named “DIALOGUE” and is 21.5” long.  The widest bead is 1.25” and the toggle is 2.75” long.  I recommend chunky silver earrings with this necklace. It is very chunky, but not very heavy due to the lightness of wood beads.  It is $139 which includes shipping and insurance.

The necklace is named “DIALOGUE” and is 21.5” long. The widest bead is 1.25” and the toggle is 2.75” long. I recommend chunky silver earrings with this necklace. It is very chunky, but not very heavy due to the lightness of wood beads. It is $139 which includes shipping and insurance.

For years, I have been designing a style of necklace I call “One of a Kind” or, in my shorthand, OOK.  They originated from chunky orphan beads, leftover onesie or twosie charmers, tossed into a box.  One day a necklace designed itself in that box and my first OOK emerged.  They feature as many different beads as possible:  it’s a fun challenge not to repeat beads, even though I do allow myself to for superior design.

I’ve probably made 30 of them since I declared myself a bead jewelry artist in 1995.  But it took gallerist, Gail Sewell reminding me how much she likes them, to get me habitually thinking about OOKs.  Now she gets first dibs for her Chambers Gallery in Cambria, CA!

This necklace’s genesis was five large wood beads (from the top:  an ebony and resin assemblage; a bird’s eye in soft wood; coco as in coconut; a finely carved snake which in Chinese mythology signifies cleverness; then another coco).  A notable bead is the obelisk-shaped carved soapstone with images of a stylized fish.  Balancing the wood are some opaque rock crystal beads with subtle brown markings.

This OOK demanded a striking clasp with a solid silver ethnic circle. The wood toggle, formerly known as a button, I found with my knitter friends, Tess and Dottie, on a fun driving trip to Webs, the biggest yarn shop ever.

 

REGARDING MY MURANO BEADS, stay tuned.  I’ve designed only one necklace, a fairly “safe” medallion, pictured below, because the big unique beauties I selected in Italy are currently intimidating me.  They have to be fabulous, and they will be, but they need to take their time.

Murano millefiori disc bezeled in sterling silver, with Baltic amber chips and sterling silver clasp; 18.5” to 19” adjustable length.  Priced at $99 including shipping and insurance.

Murano millefiori disc bezeled in sterling silver, with Baltic amber chips and sterling silver clasp; 18.5” to 19” adjustable length. Priced at $99 including shipping and insurance.