Drawer 21: Yellow

“Moralist of the Quotidian”

My Apothecary Chest: in 1994, it arrived via container to California from Hong Kong, where I discovered beading during an ex-pat assignment there. Serves as the repository for my beads.  Handcrafted.  It has 52 Drawers.

2017 Challenge: Create a Necklace a Week, using only the Beads from one Drawer at a time. Voila!  52 Necklaces!

Week 21/Drawer 21: May 24, 2017: “Moralist of the Quotidian”

This week I shall wax poetic over a recent 2015 memory of finding this centerpiece rather than the 20-year old memories detailed in previous blogs!

An inspiring friend, Nancy Cusack, now an Adjunct Professor Emerita at Mass College of Art and Design, Boston, and Visual Artist, invites her friends to unique events at the College. I was excited to attend the opening of an exhibit of broken/unused/unwanted jewelry recycled by Professor Joe Wood’s Jewelry class into chic new wearables!  This brooch was so captivating that I immediately put it in my hand as I finished looking around.  I knew it would make a fabulous centerpiece for a yet-to-be-determined necklace!

The beads accompanying the centerpiece turn out to be very simple: sand cast African glass from the yellow drawer with a hue so close to the flowers that they were destined to be together.  These beads have been made in Ghana since the 1600s.  In their unique process, pulverized glass is poured into a clay mold, with a local cassava reed placed where the hole should be.  The mold goes into a furnace which heats it up to where it congeals, and the cassava burns away.

I also used a few interlocking flower disc beads, also made in Africa and used as trade beads (more on trade beads in blog dated February 8, 2017). Find them in the back of the brooch and at the end of the necklace.

A fun clasp makes the back look good. A vintage resin button serves as a toggle to the black glass circle.  Earwires are blackened silver with matching beads.

The necklace is 21” long; the centerpiece is 1.5” diameter. $99 for set.

 

Here is an image of one of my other purchases at the Recycled Exhibit—a clever repurposing of faux pearls studded with silver solder and attached to two intertwined chains. It has become my go-to daily necklace when I’m dashing out of the house and no time to choose one of my own creations. Also a quotidian!

Drawer 13: Beige

“Find the Edge”

My Apothecary Chest: in 1994, it arrived via container to California from Hong Kong, where I discovered beading during an ex-pat assignment there. Serves as the repository for my beads.  Handcrafted.  It has 52 Drawers.

2017 Challenge: Create a Necklace a Week, using only the Beads from one Drawer at a time. Voila!  52 Necklaces!

Week 13/Drawer 13: March 29, 2017: “Find the Edge”

 

I didn’t have to worry about beige being boring when I explored the Number 13 beige Drawer: the calcite reached out to me! It is a very textural stone:  faceted, sparkling yet soft and complex in its coloration (sounds like a fine wine, doesn’t it?) but there is something mysterious going on inside all those white markings.  I confess I knew nothing about this semi-precious stone, and was surprised to find it is related to chalk, limestone and marble!

The spacer beads are soft and rounded and called sunstone which gets its warm color from copper. This mineral is the official gemstone of the State of Oregon and is said to bring good luck as well as make you feel lively and enthusiastic.


The broach has some history with me: at a California outdoor Art Festival, I fell in love with its clean lines and the interesting wire wrap on the surface.  I enjoyed wearing it on my business suit throughout the Eighties.  Yes, we dressed for work in those days!  When I retired, I reinvented it as a centerpiece and it remained there until last week.  The crystal on top sure looked like calcite to me, so I selected it to make this necklace great.

This necklace is 21” long with a brass clasp. The broach is 2” x 2.5”.  Wear your gold earrings with it. $85.

 

BROOCH FANTASIA

I will accept commissions combining your favorite brooch, contemporary or family antique, with my orphan pearls and appropriate other beads, probably seed beads and crystals.  The cost would be approximately $139.  We can exchange photos of your brooch and I’ll give you a firm quote.

I will accept commissions combining your favorite brooch, contemporary or family antique, with my orphan pearls and appropriate other beads, probably seed beads and crystals. The cost would be approximately $139. We can exchange photos of your brooch and I’ll give you a firm quote.

 

 

Time for something different! This is a beautiful Beadleful necklace and I am not ashamed of my pride because every time I wear it, I get many compliments. I shall tell you its story because I would like you to have the opportunity to have one of your own.

Over the years, when pearls, the freshwater variety I love to use, wouldn’t fit through my regular beading wire, I put them in a jar. Around the same time, I acquired this colorful brooch that my friend, Kyung and I bought in Christian Lacroix’ shop in the exclusive Carleton Hotel on La Croisette in Cannes. While we browsed, our husbands waited outside by the sea, watching the bathers. Needless to say, they weren’t bored.

We each found an irresistible brooch featured in Lacroix’ end-of-season sale. I used to wear mine to work on my suit lapel–so 1990’s. Fashion changed; I retired; the brooch went into my drawer.

Around 2010, my last year in California, I put the orphan pearls and the neglected brooch together. The pearls are of all sizes and shapes, drawn randomly from my stash, but strung on finer than normal bead wire. I used Japanese glass seed beads, fine and shiny, as well as crystals to add interest to the pearls. It takes five strands at a minimum to look good! I made an investment in a real gold or sterling silver clasp because this is a personal heirloom.

And I can do the same for you.

I will accept commissions combining your favorite brooch, contemporary or family antique, with my orphan pearls and appropriate other beads, probably seed beads and crystals. The cost would be approximately $139. We can exchange photos of your brooch and I’ll give you a firm quote. There’s only one disclosure; you must be aware that the fine bead wire I use means it’s fairly fragile, so handle with care.

 

Caption: This 18” long necklace of pearls and a favorite brooch is a show-stopper.