Drawer 19: Orange

Left to right: ‘S Wonderful and Lady Be Good

My Apothecary Chest: in 1994, it arrived via container to California from Hong Kong, where I discovered beading during an ex-pat assignment there. Serves as the repository for my beads.  Handcrafted.  It has 52 Drawers.

2017 Challenge: Create a Necklace a Week, using only the Beads from one Drawer at a time. Voila!  52 Necklaces!

Week 19/Drawer 19: May 3, 2017: “’S Wonderful” and “Lady Be Good” (Thanks, Gershwin!) 

An Ode to Orange:  It was accidental that I fell in love with orange and it was simultaneous with becoming a red-head.  It was primarily a wardrobe choice; then a home accessory; then beads.  A few years later I noticed I was presenting too many orange/coral/peach/rust necklaces, so I pulled back.  Now I settle for one at a time.  Never bore your collectors!

I found two interesting choices in Drawer 19, so I indulged my orange love and made two…against the better advice of mentors!

‘ S Wonderful is orange carnelian (read about carnelian in 3-22-17 blog) faceted beads, both small and medium in size, with a bold orange dichroic pendant with charming green squiggles and matching earrings. I found the dichroic at Glass Garden, made by a couple from Michigan,  in Bonita Springs, Florida, at their large 2016 Art Fair when all five Kelley Girls attended and enjoyed!  It is 19” + a 1.5” pendant.  Gold tone clasp. Priced at $89 for the set.

Lady Be Good started with the centerpiece, as most of my necklaces do. This creative take on a pod by Gail Crosman Moore (see blogs dated 4-12-17 and 5-11-16) is sculpted in oxidized brass in two pieces.  Inside is a lampwork glass thingie.  Feel free to name it!  I found a perfect match to the thingie in some orange vintage pressed glass melon-style beads.  I went longer for a 24” length + a 2” pod with a brass circle and toggle clasp and matching earrings.  $129 for the set.

This time I tried to be brief with words since I have three images, including one of me and my sisters looking like tourists under a banyan in Bonita Springs last year!

Left to right: Priscilla, Gail, Nancy, Maureen and Marilyn

 

 

 

 

 

 

Drawer 12: Carnelian

“legendary Heroes”

Week 12/Drawer 12: March 22, 2017: “Legendary Heroes”

I do love carnelian. It is a semi-precious stone that is found in all shades of brown, almost every one tinged with orange.  Now you know why I love it!

I probably say I love this or that bead in every blog. I suppose that’s why I’m still beading 23 years on!

Carnelian is a member of the Quartz family. It is considered the stone of creativity, individuality and courage.

This necklace started with the centerpiece, named a talhakimt. Over the years, I have purchased every interesting one I have seen and parcel them out into necklaces every few years.  They are always based on the triangle/circle design.  I have only one more truly interesting one left plus about 5 smaller ones that were originally men’s rings.  The design feels very graphic and crisp to me; contemporary rather than ethnic.

Talhakimts such as this one were carved of large banded agate in the nineteenth century in Idar-Oberstein, a famous stone cutting center in Germany, a location that means more to bead nuts than the less-obsessed. They were favored by the Tuareg people, pastoral nomads who controlled several Sahara trading routes, and are descendants of the true Berbers who predated the Romans in their settlements.  This rare talisman adorned Tuareg women’s hair.  I found it interesting to learn the Tuaregs are a matrilineal society.

It is always a design challenge to figure out how to attach the unusual centerpieces, which I love to collect, to my necklace. From the get-go I knew this necklace would be pure carnelian:  therein was the attachment answer.  I found a bag with some very old carnelian (see above photo) which was also small in size.  No two alike…all the better to see the varying colors of carnelian!  Also notice their patina (wear)…visualize them a century ago in a Tuareg’s bag in a camel caravan travelling across the Sahara to a trading bazaar at the next oasis!

It should be no surprise that beads were money in many sociieties, from the Tuaregs to American Indians who invented heishi [pronounced “he she”], which are the small brass spacers used in this necklace. Our forebears, however, used shell as their money.  Today heishi are any small round beads made by hand from natural materials.

The necklace itself is designed with highly polished carnelian nuggets separated by brass heishi.

This necklace is 23” long with a brass clasp. The talhakimt is 3”.  Wear with your gold earrings.  $99.