Happy New Year

Today, January 4, 2016, is the first day back to work in the New Year.   Dear readers, may you be happy, healthy and productive in 2016!

 AN ANNIVERSARY

Writing this on Dec 10, 2015 marks the fifth anniversary of my return to Boston, or more specifically, Hull, a small town on the South Shore.  It’s trite but true:  time flies!

 CALIFORNIA NOSTALGIA

 Thanksgiving, 2015:  When I booked my trip back to California in February, I thought it would celebrate my post-knee replacement return to travel.  It was much more:  it was a return to warm embraces by old friends in San Jose and San Luis Obispo.

 I was seeking the past and I found the present—it was marvelous!

 In San Jose, I stayed in the Paris room at Bob and Sandra’s + the perfect dog Rubee, a Golden Retriever.  We enjoyed great girlfriend time, lots of R&R, good shopping, fabulous wine-ing and dining.

 Next I drove three hours south to San Luis Obispo where Don and I moved in 2000.  The weather was great for the whole trip; especially 72 degrees upon my arrival seemed very welcoming!  I met girlfriends for coffee and catching up.  I was invited to dinner at Patti and Robbie’s, who just sold their olive oil and balsamic vinegar company (www.robbinsfamilyfarm.com  It’s delicious!  Order some; they send it to me; you can enjoy it too.  Burt and Diane, my husband’s and my first friends at Edna Ranch where we lived among the vineyards, drove me there.

 Then on Dec 3rd I traveled through time with Sharon and Rich who invited the other four couples of the Wine Club, founded in 2000, for a reunion.  Sandy bought a bottle of Chardonnay from that year…we all tasted it and reminisced.  Yes, we made Chard and Pinot Noir in our garages in 60 gallon French oak barrels.  Each barrel makes 270 bottles.  We were pretty good at it!  My friends still make wine.

It had to end; all vacations do.  I went out with a bang—driving to Santa Barbara with my bead sister, Elaine; shopping at the Gem Faire (3 times as large as what’s available in all of New England); lunching at Tre Lune; shopping on Coast Village Road; and a drop off at the airport for my trip to SFO where a red eye was waiting to whisk me to Logan

It was a great trip.  Very rejuvenating.  Emotionally satisfying; confirming that old friends are still friends

20 Years as a Bead Jewelry Artist

After 20 years, I am retiring my old logo of necklaces in the form of a “B”.  This is a good moment to thank Don Beadle for my fabulous last name!  Stay tuned for the new logo…hint…it’s orange.

After 20 years, I am retiring my old logo of necklaces in the form of a “B”. This is a good moment to thank Don Beadle for my fabulous last name! Stay tuned for the new logo…hint…it’s orange.

 

“Would you like to move to Hong Kong?”  Don’t the most fun things begin with a question?

 

My husband was offered a job assignment in Hong Kong in 1993, so I resigned from my Human Resources job and went along for the adventure.

Hong Kong is a shopper’s paradise, and I soon discovered I was attracted to beads.  When I filled up my drawers and started putting boxes of them under the bed, my husband asked me why I had so many beads.

My future became destined when I blurted out, “I’m going to make necklaces!”  So I set out to do so.  I thought my designs looked pretty fine, and, wisely, took a class to learn the fundamentals.

As a final judgment to my opinion on the attractiveness of my necklaces, I submitted them to the 1994 annual exhibit of the Royal Crafts Guild of Hong Kong, and was accepted.

 

In 1995, I decided I was retired from my corporate life. Bead jewelry became my business.  I wanted the risk of succeeding or failing.  It could never just be a hobby for me.  I took that brave step at the Silicon Valley Open Studios and loved every minute of it.

I still love the challenge of offering my work for sale:  it’s an instant thumbs up or down and it gives me feedback.  A thumbs down means that necklace gets taken apart at the end of the year and gets another chance at greatness.

Here we are in 2015.  I have made nearly 2700 necklaces; I never tire of the search for fabulous beads; and I still try to spend at least two hours several days a week in my studio.  I have changed marketplaces three times:  from Silicon Valley to San Luis Obispo to the South Shore of Boston.  I love change!

In 2015, I am working on being “Stupendous in my Seventies” and, when the time comes, “Energetic in my Eighties!”  All for the love of beads!

BROOCH FANTASIA

I will accept commissions combining your favorite brooch, contemporary or family antique, with my orphan pearls and appropriate other beads, probably seed beads and crystals.  The cost would be approximately $139.  We can exchange photos of your brooch and I’ll give you a firm quote.

I will accept commissions combining your favorite brooch, contemporary or family antique, with my orphan pearls and appropriate other beads, probably seed beads and crystals. The cost would be approximately $139. We can exchange photos of your brooch and I’ll give you a firm quote.

 

 

Time for something different! This is a beautiful Beadleful necklace and I am not ashamed of my pride because every time I wear it, I get many compliments. I shall tell you its story because I would like you to have the opportunity to have one of your own.

Over the years, when pearls, the freshwater variety I love to use, wouldn’t fit through my regular beading wire, I put them in a jar. Around the same time, I acquired this colorful brooch that my friend, Kyung and I bought in Christian Lacroix’ shop in the exclusive Carleton Hotel on La Croisette in Cannes. While we browsed, our husbands waited outside by the sea, watching the bathers. Needless to say, they weren’t bored.

We each found an irresistible brooch featured in Lacroix’ end-of-season sale. I used to wear mine to work on my suit lapel–so 1990’s. Fashion changed; I retired; the brooch went into my drawer.

Around 2010, my last year in California, I put the orphan pearls and the neglected brooch together. The pearls are of all sizes and shapes, drawn randomly from my stash, but strung on finer than normal bead wire. I used Japanese glass seed beads, fine and shiny, as well as crystals to add interest to the pearls. It takes five strands at a minimum to look good! I made an investment in a real gold or sterling silver clasp because this is a personal heirloom.

And I can do the same for you.

I will accept commissions combining your favorite brooch, contemporary or family antique, with my orphan pearls and appropriate other beads, probably seed beads and crystals. The cost would be approximately $139. We can exchange photos of your brooch and I’ll give you a firm quote. There’s only one disclosure; you must be aware that the fine bead wire I use means it’s fairly fragile, so handle with care.

 

Caption: This 18” long necklace of pearls and a favorite brooch is a show-stopper.

Picaresque

 

 

Necklace "Picaresque"

 

I intuitively named this necklace “Picaresque.” Upon thinking of the meaning as rogue or bohemian, it is really appropriate. This necklace is all about the centerpiece; I made it in a class in the 90’s, wore it in the bohemian era on a cord, and put it aside.

Recycled, reused and re-invented, it is happy now with yellow jade beads tying the centerpiece to the necklace. Only after living in Hong Kong and becoming a regular at the Jade Market did I realize how many colors of jade there are! This strand is a honey mustard shade, interspersed with the same ethnic beads as the centerpiece. It is finished with a gold metal clasp.

Let me describe the delicious beads featured in the centerpiece: The most roguish are the two irregular rounds of ram’s horn—the first and only time I had a chance to buy ram’s horn; from Morocco’s Atlas Mountains as I recall. My next favorite beads are the jasper and yellow striped beads. They are trade beads from Mozambique that I bought in a Lisbon, Portugal flea market in 1965…long before beading was a word that had even drifted through my mind!

You’ll also notice a conical wood bead in the same honey mustard shade, two ethnic jasper beads of unknown provenance, green sand-cast glass African beads, and glass jasper spacers. The framework for the centerpiece is brass wire.

The necklace measures 22” with the centerpiece 3” wide by 3 ½” long. The price is $215 including shipping.

Trunk Show

Trunk Show December 6 & 7 2013

Hail West Coasters!

Hope to see you for my THIRD ANNUAL TRUNK SHOW…

 

Spring

I last wrote in the Fall.  Now it is Spring.  I am not yet a good New Englander as I don’t enjoy Winter weather.  It’s my opinion Winter is definitely over:   the weather feels warmer;  bulbs are emerging from the soil; I’m tempted to put out pots and fill them with flowers.  The lesson Winter teaches me is to embrace Spring.

It also seems that each time I write there has been a transition in my life and this time is no different.  My husband Don’s long eight-year journey with Alzheimer’s Disease ended on March 8, 2013.  He died very peacefully and quickly.  Those of us on the journey with Don were gratified that he always had a smile for us and never stopped teasing us.  He recognized us each time we visited.  Our memories of Don are happy ones.  It’s been a long goodbye.

There will be a Celebration of his Life in Saratoga, CA, on April 20.  This summer there will be a memorial service and interment in the Columbarium at Glastonbury Abbey, Hingham, MA, followed by an East Coast celebration.

Transitions are important for personal growth and I look forward to whatever changes and opportunities will flow into my life and will be forever thankful to Donnie for twenty wonderful years.