GOLDSTONE

“Grand Illusion”

As I reach the end of my second regular blogging year (weekly in 2017; monthly in 2018 and onward…), this Goldstone research produced my first big “Aha!”

For almost 25 years, I have assumed Goldstone was one of my beloved semi-precious stones found in Nature.  It’s called stone, right?  But no!  It is a glass product cooked up by artisans!  I am not disappointed, dear readers, because it still is a fabulous glittering glass and it makes a great necklace.  I am now informed!

The original goldstone manufacturing process was developed in 17th century Venice (and Murano) by the Miotti family and exclusively licensed to them by the Doge.  The ingredients include silica, copper and other metal oxides to produce glass containing tiny crystals of metallic copper.

I have also used blue goldstone which I now know substitutes cobalt for copper.

This 22″ necklace contains two sizes of facteted goldstone with a center bead called a briolette, also faceted, which plays up the glitter very nicely.  Copper clasp and matching earrings.  $69 for the set.

 

 

 

 

How Do I Love Copper?

Let me count the ways. It is warm in texture and in color. It is different: not gold nor silver. You can actually find earrings in the retail world…or in my studio. Yes, copper has moved into the mainstream. I’ve been using it in my jewelry since the late 90’s and I remain firmly committed to this orange-y metal. Now there is a clue why I like it!

This necklace is named Anisoptera, the species name for dragonfly and which, translated from the Greek, means uneven wings. It is made in Mexico from Patty Healy (CA) designs and executed in copper and brass. What I find unique about her use of copper is that she has it heated with a torch resulting in a bright and warm red-orange color. Note also the brass accents soldered on the wings and those perfect brass bug eyes!

I wanted the necklace to stay with the copper color, so I used a coordinating strand of dyed freshwater pearls with a tad of apricot pearls as contrast.

I made the clasp from copper wire: I hammered the circle flat and hardened it in that process; the toggle is bent copper wire. I want my necklaces to look as good from the back as from the front! I made earrings to accompany the necklace. The earrings are 1 ½” long with copper ear wires.

The necklace measures 18 ½” long. The dragonfly is 3 ½” long and a little over 2” wide. “Anisoptera” is light and easy to wear, not to mention fun! The price is $125 and includes shipping.

This necklace is named Anisoptera, the species name for dragonfly and which, translated from the Greek, means uneven wings.  The pendant is made in Mexico from Patty Healy (CA) designs and executed in copper and brass.

This necklace is named Anisoptera, the species name for dragonfly and which, translated from the Greek, means uneven wings. The pendant is made in Mexico from Patty Healy (CA) designs and executed in copper and brass.